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Made with Interaction Institute for Social Change and Center for Story-based Strategy | Artist: Angus Maguire.

Explain to pupils that we are going to learn about one of the United Nations’ Global Goals for Sustainable Development: Goal 10, Reduced Inequalities.  

Goal 10 aims to reduce inequality within and among countries. Ask pupils to share their thoughts on what the word ‘inequality’ means. Can they give any examples?  

You might want to show pupils information on Goal 10, which includes some examples of inequality.

Explain that the Goal aims to ‘Leave no one behind’, should be met for all nations and people, for all groups in society and should first reach those who are furthest behind.

Now, cut out the inequality cards and ask pupils to sort them into three groups:

  • Example of equality
  • Example of inequality
  • Not sure.

The activity can also be done online.

Ask the pupils to share and discuss the reasons for their answers. Ask questions to build deeper understanding, such as 'Does working hard always result in earning more money?'

Next, introduce the concepts of equality, equity, liberation and merit, using the definitions and images given. Which of the cards relate to which words?

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British Council | Artist: Teresa Robertson

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Made with Interaction Institute for Social Change and Center for Story-based Strategy | Artist: Angus Maguire.

 

 

INEQUALITY

Not everyone is given the same chance. Some people may face unfair treatment, for example, when applying for jobs or when they encounter the police.

EQUITY

Those with different needs have their needs met in order to have the same chance as others. For example, when the law requires public buildings or services to be accessible to those with disabilities.

LIBERATION

People who face discrimination or oppression are set free from things that unfairly constrain or oppress them such as certain rules, structures or attitudes.

MERIT

Those who, in fair competition with others, have worked harder or are better at something, deserve more. For example, a pupil may win a prize for an outstanding piece of work. However, sometimes the competition is not fair because some people have privileges or advantages over others.